Reviews

Paraglider Review: 2010 Pegas Power X 20

Flown 2010-Nov-15 , Reviewed 2010-Dec-4 | Ratings: 1 is bad, 10 is good | Para200 Specs | About the Testing

See Flying Small Wings.

The Power X is Pegas' targeted entry into motoring wings, specifically the realm of small, fun wings. Like many in this class, they're intended for experienced pilots. At 19.5 m� flat (16.9 m� projected) it's a hotrod even for my 150 pounds. I flew on a Blackhawk 172 weighing about 75 pounds so I my wing loading was quite high. Weight was 237 pounds (150 + 75 + 12 for wing) so the wing loading was pretty high at 14 pounds per m�.

Handling (7): The handling is quite conventional with sportiness derived mostly from being heavily loaded.

Inflation (7): Each time I flew it there was enough wind for a pretty easy reverse and it came up crisply. Even in calm wind it should be straightforward and small-wing easy.

Efficiency (-): Without a sink rate test it's hard to say but it felt like it would be as good as any modern EN-B or DHV 1-2 wing.

Speed (-): Too cold for testing speed! Sorry. But I was flying circles around everyone at the field as you would expect given the high wing loading.

Construction (-): It's well built with one unique feature that I didn't even notice right away. The leading edge has a Mylar line running spanwise along it. I'm not sure if the wing is made for acro but this sure would help avoid the wing coming apart in flight. And I've watched that happen on another (probably well-worn) glider after a a maneuver went bad. His lines went slack and, when it reloaded with a bang, the glider split in two. That's not likely with this Pegas.

Certification & Safety (-): It's not certified and I'm not ballsy enough to do collapse tests on small gliders but it's handling was straightforward, even a bit subdued for a wing this small. Although I still wouldn't recommend a beginner go this heavily loaded it would be a good first step in that direction.

Overall (-): This would be a good wing for someone wanting to explore smaller wings, and the handling and speed that goes with them. It's still gonna be faster on takeoff and landing, and be less forgiving of errors, so I'd recommend them only to someone with experience enough to safely handle flying small wings.

For more information, please visit www.air-x.com.

Lance Marczak takes the Pegan for a ride.


© 2016 Jeff Goin & Tim Kaiser   Remember: If there's air there, it should be flown in!