PPG Troubleshooter

Solutions to problems for paramotor pilots  | suggestions? send them along.

Motor Problems

Redrives & clutches

 

Propeller Problems

 

Related

Chapter 12: Setup & Maintenance
Parts & Service
Tools

Tips on non-motor hardware improvements

Winterizing your Paramotor by Alex Varv

 

Shutting Down

The motor continues to run even after activating the kill switch | Emergency Kill

All gas paramotors that I'm aware of shut down the engine by preventing a spark. The preferred method is by shorting out the coil with a switch on the throttle stem. Anything that allows the kill switch to short out will shut off the motor by preventing a spark just like the pilot was pressing the kill switch.

Problem

Possible solution or link.

The motor tries to die but does not.

1. The Kill Switch wire is only loosely touching any of its terminations or is broken at any point along its run, the motor will not quit although it may run rough. It may look fine but the wire is broken inside its insulation.

2. It may be Dieseling is where the motor continues to run even in the absence of spark. It is usually because of heavy carbon deposits on the piston and cylinder head. These deposits remain hot enough to continue igniting the fuel-air mixture. Decarbon the head.

The motor will not quit at all

1. The kill wire is disconnected.

2. The switch is defective.

Coil Kill Wire Repair

If the kill switch becomes disconnected right at the coil, you're best off replacing the coil (you might not even see the break). However, this field fix might work if you're willing to accept the possibility of destroying your coil in the process. That would, of course, make your motor un-startable.

If the kill wire breaks off at the coil, screw in a very thin screw onto where the kill wire went in. Go too deep and you'll short out the coil, destroying it. Once the screw is secure, connect the kill wire to it.

Another approach is this one by Paul Lindquist:

Using a reasonably powerful soldering iron or gun, melt the black stuff around the copper stud until it is exposed. Don't melt too deep and get into the primary winding. Now solder the wire back onto the stud. If you are having trouble getting the solder to stick to the stud you are using too cool of a solder gun/iron. Then put high temp silicone (doesn't have to be super high temp) around the top of the coil where the kill wire and spark plug wire exit the coil. I also put a dab of silicone where the kill wire enters the throttle cable bundle to dissipate vibration.
 

 


2015 Jeff Goin   Remember: If there's air there, it should be flown in!