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Jeff Goin

 

 

In the Hood

2008 Mar 25 A Morning Trip to Portland and Beyond

Another day, another bunch of dramatic views, including Mount Hood. No, this isn't paramotor flying but it has some cool moments. Just don't blow a launch.

Today was a long one. Five legs from Spokane (GEG) to Portland (PDX) to Sacramento (SMF) to Las Vegas (LAS) to Kansas City (MCI) and finally to Saint Louis (STL). We never spent more than 30 minutes in each place.

Cookies Anyone?

Check out Flight Attendant Dana with a D at right. Besides a wonderful personality, she doles out a mean confection. Cookies, that is. They're for sale at www.BellePetiteSweets.net, a web-based bakery of unique and very tasty goodies. I'll vouch for them, too.

Cruising the Coast

This trip went mostly up and down the left coast, as many do, with perfect weather the whole time. Nary an instrument approach was needed.

1. This picture lacks the resolution to show what was so intriguing. Water was flowing southbound and this island caused what looked like a bow wave as the water flowed around it.
2. The marine layer holding just off shore from Torrey Pines gliderport.
3. An airplane landing while Fedex awaits his turn at the runway.
4. Enjoy the green for soon it will turn brown. Coming into Oakland, CA puts you over these luschous green hills to the south. I've paramotored just west of here and it's even prettier when you can drag your feet through it. My boss frowns on that in the 737, though.

 

1. Lake Mead east of Las Vegas is shrinking. By the time they finish the new high bridge downstream of Hoover Dam, there won't be any water to cross.
2. Coming out of Spokane, WA, we had very few passengers and minimal fuel (very lightweight.) The "Guppy" has a lot of get-up-and-go as you can see by the pegged climb rate indicator. It shows we're rocketing skyward at 6000+ feet per minute (fpm). That's impressive on its own but, in this case, we're doing it at 29,000 feet!
3. Arriving into Portland, Mount Hood was sporting a hood. This cap cloud forms from the rising air forced up its slope.
4. Another gorgeous way to see San Francisco Bay. Just be glad you're not in that traffic Jam.

 

1. The view out my hotel window in Spokane was great.
The view out the cockpit windows is even better.
2. Golden Gate Bridge.
3. San Diego and Torrey Pines.

Time Missed

For what seems like forever, projects have ruled my life, keeping me holed up behind computer screens and documents and other distractions. That will continue, I'm sure, but with the latest major project in production, it was time for a break. Tonight, I enjoyed that welcome freedom and spent some time with my  particularly entertaining fellow crewmembers.

With the right folks, it can be a mighty fun time, and these guys certainly qualified! Flying with them was enjoyable but hanging out was even better.

Time is the one thing we'll never get more of, so we best use it wisely. Sometimes, that means just having fun with it.

Dana not only makes tasty cookies, she is quite the songstress and funny girl. They were all were great to be around. It was a good time.

1. Dana models one of her treats just before Jim scarfed it down.

2. Jim takes us out of Reno, Nevada. Yes, they still let us touch the controls. It is still work  but can be beautiful in the process. Below about 18,000 feet we do have to be particularly alert and businesslike.

3. PPG Pilot Mark Ares wound up on my flight from Portland to Sacramento. He made the mistake of letting me know about it. After the flight, I swapped seats with him: "Ah, this 737 is just like my ParaFlyer!" Launching is sure a lot more reliable. Mark shares air with the fanatics of northern California: Sacramento's Sod Flyers. He was a trooper because my enroute P.A. singled him out as a celebrity aviator. Sorry Mark.


Remember, If there's air there, it should be flown in!